Want to see how our planet has changed over the past 37 years?

Google has made the largest update to its Timelapse service since 2017. By combining 24 million satellite images of the Earth, experts have created videos that show how our planet has changed since 1984. To create a massive video of the changes on the planet, Google experts have collected 20 petabytes of information into one “video mosaic”. The size of such a video took 4.4 terapixels, which is equivalent to 530 thousand videos in 4K resolution.

Google notes that they have created more videos on the planet.

“And all of this computation was done in our 100% renewable energy carbon-neutral data centers as part of our commitment to help build a carbon-free future,” notes Google.

To explore the Earth in Timelapse, you can simply follow link go to Google Earth and use the search to select any place on the planet. In addition, Google has already uploaded over 800 Timelapse videos in both 2D and 3D for general use.

“Over the past half century, our planet has undergone rapid environmental changes ㅡ more than at any other moment in human history. Thanks to Timelapse, we have a clear picture of our changing planet right at hand ㅡ one that shows not just problems, but also ways to solve them, as well as beautiful natural phenomena that unfold over decades, ”write in Google.

Timelapse was launched in 2013 as an extension to Google Earth. The main goal of this project was to show the impact of climate change and human activities on the environment in a convenient 3D model format.

To create a massive video of the changes on the planet, Google experts have collected 20 petabytes of information into one “video mosaic”. The size of such a video took 4.4 terapixels, which is equivalent to 530 thousand videos in 4K resolution. …



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