A cloud of African dust will cover Greece this weekend

ERT meteorologist Sakis Arnautoglu is warning Greeks of “particularly intense African dust transport this weekend”, which he says “requires special attention”.

The latest available data indicate that the highest concentrations of dust across most of the country will be recorded in the west, center and south on Saturday, and in the north, east and south on Sunday.

Due to the increased concentration of dust, in addition to the limited visibility it can cause, the weather events (rain/storms) expected to occur in several areas will in many cases have a “mud” character, reports lifo.gr. On Good Monday, April 18, a gradual decrease in high concentrations of dust in the air is expected.

Who should pay special attention to:

  • Adults with respiratory problems.
  • Adults with diseases of the cardiovascular system and children with respiratory diseases should limit any intense physical activity, especially if they are performed outdoors.

“In general, any person who feels discomfort (burning in the eyes or suffering from cough, nasal congestion, sore throat) would do well to limit their physical activity in the open air,” the expert emphasized.

Recall, as the Athens News previously wrote, atmospheric transport phenomenon of “African dust” well known for its visual manifestation: the “exotic”, often yellowish light that floods the sky. Nevertheless, this natural phenomenon has many rather serious consequences for human health, which are ignored by most of the population. According to the National Observatory of Athens, the phenomenon of “African dust” will come in the pre-Easter week.

The dust that “comes to us” from Africa
The amount of dust rising into the atmosphere is estimated at 150-700 million tons per year. Scientists record that, along with solid particles, fungi and bacteria are transferred. Otherwise, according to the Athens National Observatory, its main composition is silicon, iron and manganese. The main “suppliers” of African dust are the regions of Chad and Algeria, as well as Libya and Egypt.

Impact on public health
According to the National Observatory of Athens, during the period when African dust was in the atmosphere of settlements, an increased number of patient visits to hospitals and medical institutions (in particular, people with respiratory and heart problems) was recorded.

Vulnerable groups to be on the lookout for during the spread of African dust:

  • Adults and children with allergies,
  • Adults and children with breathing problems,
  • People suffering from asthma
  • Patients with heart disease
  • Pregnant women,
  • People over 65 years of age.

The National Observatory of Athens has issued a circular – instructions for the population, so that people themselves can identify dangerous symptoms.

  • cough,
  • dyspnea,
  • discomfort,
  • heaviness or pain in the chest,
  • wheezing breath,
  • dermatitis,
  • headaches,
  • dizziness.

Those who belong to vulnerable groups should follow the following guidelines:

  • Avoid contact with dust (do not leave the house).
  • Avoid being outdoors, playing sports and outdoor activities unless absolutely necessary.
  • Breathe through your nose (so that the air properly enters the nasal cavity and is cleaned in it).
  • Wear a protective mask before going outside.
  • Those who suffer from asthma may need more frequent inhalations of the drug.

If symptoms persist or worsen, you should contact your doctor or health facility.

Effects of African dust on the economy and the environment
According to the National Observatory of Athens, African dust has a negative impact on the economy. In the midst of this phenomenon, there is a problem with air transport as well as agricultural production.

At the same time, dust is an obstacle to the production of photovoltaic energy – both due to the reduction of solar radiation and dust pollution of photovoltaic panels. Environmentally, African dust increases the proliferation of phytoplankton in the seas, with subsequent changes in the food chain.

The dustiness of the atmosphere creates a screen for the sun’s rays, reducing their penetration to the Earth, which also affects the formation of clouds and precipitation.

The dust that “comes to us” from Africa
The amount of dust rising into the atmosphere is estimated at 150-700 million tons per year. Scientists record that, along with solid particles, fungi and bacteria are transferred. Otherwise, according to the Athens National Observatory, its main composition is silicon, iron and manganese. The main “suppliers” of African dust are the regions of Chad and Algeria, as well as Libya and Egypt.

Impact on public health
According to the National Observatory of Athens, during the period when African dust was in the atmosphere of settlements, an increased number of patient visits to hospitals and medical institutions (in particular, people with respiratory and heart problems) was recorded.

Vulnerable groups to be on the lookout for during the spread of African dust:

  • Adults and children with allergies,
  • Adults and children with breathing problems,
  • People suffering from asthma
  • Patients with heart disease
  • Pregnant women,
  • People over 65 years of age.

The National Observatory of Athens has issued a circular – instructions for the population, so that people themselves can identify dangerous symptoms.

  • cough,
  • dyspnea,
  • discomfort,
  • heaviness or pain in the chest,
  • wheezing breath,
  • dermatitis,
  • headaches,
  • dizziness.

Those who belong to vulnerable groups should follow the following guidelines:

  • Avoid contact with dust (do not leave the house).
  • Avoid being outdoors, playing sports and outdoor activities unless absolutely necessary.
  • Breathe through your nose (so that the air properly enters the nasal cavity and is cleaned in it).
  • Wear a protective mask before going outside.
  • Those who suffer from asthma may need more frequent inhalations of the drug.

If symptoms persist or worsen, you should contact your doctor or health facility.

Effects of African dust on the economy and the environment
According to the National Observatory of Athens, African dust has a negative impact on the economy. In the midst of this phenomenon, there is a problem with air transport as well as agricultural production.

At the same time, dust is an obstacle to the production of photovoltaic energy – both due to the reduction of solar radiation and dust pollution of photovoltaic panels. Environmentally, African dust increases the proliferation of phytoplankton in the seas, with subsequent changes in the food chain.

The dustiness of the atmosphere creates a screen for the sun’s rays, reducing their penetration to the Earth, which also affects the formation of clouds and precipitation.



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