Whale stranded in Athens found dead on Wednesday morning

Happy ending didn’t happen. The Ministry of the Environment announced that a sick and injured whale recently washed ashore in the capital’s Alimos district was found dead on Wednesday.

As we reported earlier, sick and injured whale washed ashore on the morning of Friday, January 28 on the coast near the Alimos metropolitan area.

Veterinarian and Arion member Evgenia Skuntsu said they would try to take blood from the whale in order to determine the problem and find out why he lost his bearings.

The carcass of a dead whale was discovered in the shallow waters of the Gulf of Selinia in the east of the island of Salamina in the Saronic Gulf by a Coast Guard boat.

In accordance with the relevant protocols, a team of veterinarians was mobilized to arrange for the safe transport of the dead mammal to a special facility for an autopsy.

Samples of biological material should also be taken to determine if the mammal suffered during its lifetime, along with clinical signs, also diseases that can affect human health.

As we reported earlier, sick and injured whale washed ashore on the morning of Friday, January 28 on the coast near the Alimos metropolitan area.

Veterinarian and Arion member Evgenia Skuntsu said they would try to take blood from the whale in order to determine the problem and find out why he lost his bearings.

“Sotiris”, as the young victim was called, reacted positively to the medicine given to him. When providing first aid, a small wound on his muzzle was found in him, in connection with which he was examined and prescribed treatment. The animal responded positively to medical support and was released to the sea on Friday.

Unfortunately, damage to the face of the animal was apparently the result of a blow to the coastal rocks when losing orientation, and in the end, the disease took the life of a marine mammal.

Deputy Environment Minister Giorgos Amiras declared on Wednesday that “despite superhuman efforts to save the life of an injured and weak mammal, the young whale did not survive.” He added that “we knew from the first clinical and blood tests that the results were not encouraging.”

Some NGOs and marine life research centers have criticized the “drug treatment”, saying that several mistakes were made, one of which was, for example, injecting drugs intended for pets into a 2-ton marine mammal.

Marine Protection Institute archipelagos emphasized that the death of the whale drew attention to the lack of a state protection mechanism necessary to protect rare marine mammals.

In conversation with cycladesopen.gr hydrobiologist and Archipelagos research director Anastasia Miliou said that “every month, dozens of injured marine animals end up in the Greek seas. This case received a lot of publicity because the mammal was washed ashore in the capital of Greece.” Miliou stressed the need for a shelter in Greece for injured mammals.

“Sotiris”, as the young victim was called, reacted positively to the medicine given to him. When providing first aid, a small wound on his muzzle was found in him, in connection with which he was examined and prescribed treatment. The animal responded positively to medical support and was released to the sea on Friday.

Unfortunately, damage to the face of the animal was apparently the result of a blow to the coastal rocks when losing orientation, and in the end, the disease took the life of a marine mammal.

Deputy Environment Minister Giorgos Amiras declared on Wednesday that “despite superhuman efforts to save the life of an injured and weak mammal, the young whale did not survive.” He added that “we knew from the first clinical and blood tests that the results were not encouraging.”

Some NGOs and marine life research centers have criticized the “drug treatment”, saying that several mistakes were made, one of which was, for example, injecting drugs intended for pets into a 2-ton marine mammal.

Marine Protection Institute archipelagos emphasized that the death of the whale drew attention to the lack of a state protection mechanism necessary to protect rare marine mammals.

In conversation with cycladesopen.gr hydrobiologist and Archipelagos research director Anastasia Miliou said that “every month, dozens of injured marine animals end up in the Greek seas. This case received a lot of publicity because the mammal was washed ashore in the capital of Greece.” Miliou stressed the need for a shelter in Greece for injured mammals.



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